Eco-Restoration

Reforestation offers us a simple, low-cost solution to tackling climate change as well as providing livelihoods for the very poor and protecting & restoring wildlife. Climate change is complex but the solution doesn’t have to be. Planting trees in the tropics is essential to healing the planet and we can all make this happen.

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Our Partners

Our Partners

We Forest: Cloud Forest

We Forest: Cloud Forest

Location: Khasi Hills, Eastern State of Meghalaya

Planting Partner: We Forest

Image Credit: We Forest

Are working to restore the native forest in the Khasi Hills and reduce antropogenic pressure on forest areas through assisted natural regeneration and enrichment planting. This programme has established forest nurserys in the local communities which are used when areas need sapling enrichment.

World Land Trust: Elephant Corridors

World Land Trust: Elephant Corridors

Location: Garo Hills Of Meghalaya and Mudahalli in Karnataka

Land acquisions for Natural Regeneration Partner: World Land Trust

Image Credit: World Land Trust

Indian elephants are migrating animals, traveling huge distances to find both food and mates. Unfortunately, due to pressures of humankind, these animals are now having to come into regular contact with humans resulting in increased human-elephant conflicts. This programme aims to raise funds to acquire land into the Trust then to enable land exchange. This allows the land owners to continue their farming practices in areas away from these vital corridors, whilst allowing these areas to naturally regenerate supporting numerous other species other than just the Indian Elephant. World Land Trust is also supporting a number of other projects in India working with communities to preserve and encourage biodiversity.

Pitchandikulam: Nadakuppam Forest

Pitchandikulam: Nadakuppam Forest

Location: Nadakuppam, Tamil Nadu, South India

Planting Partner: Pitchandikulam Bio Resource Center

Image Credit: Pitchandikulam Bio Resource Center

200 years ago, Tropical Dry Evergreen Forest (TDEF) stretched for 1000km down the Coromandel coast on India’s eastern seaboard, running through the Kaliveli watershed; a unique 750 sq km rain-fed catchment. This biome provided an environment that allowed life to flourish, with records showing that even elephants once roamed here. However by 1968 when the Auroville International Township was founded less than .01% of that forest remained. Over the next 50 years due to the hard work of the Auroville foresters the 20 sq km plateau has now a complex ecosystem supporting a rich diversity of flora and fauna. Pitchandikulam Bio Resource Center,one of the Auroville Forest communities has extended the forest restoration into the Kaluveli bio region since 1973.